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call today from the international energy agency. fueling that energy renaissance: a boost in oil and shale gas because of new technologies like fracking. the group also expects the u.s. wille a neexport by 2030, meaning we'll sell more oil than we bring in. right now the u.s. imports 20% of its energy needs. >> susie: so our word on the street tonight is "oil". joining us, gregg greenberg, reporter at the hey, gregg, i know you have been talking to a lot of oil experts today. it's kind of hard to imagine the u.s. after all these years being energy independent. what were they telling new what did you hear? look, scsi, the trend is certainly favorable. it's nice to hear we are producing more energy here in america and much greater than the reverse but i have to take reports like this with a grigg grain of salt. we have been hearing about peak energy for a long time, hearing about saudi arabia's reserves for a long time and you have to take it with a haley dose of skepticism, good news then again you have to be a little bit keptic. >> susie: all right, but if you do beli
. the info technology sector was the hardest hit, down 0.8%, followed by financial and energy groups. now, after the closing bell, the focus was on cicso systems. the internet gear maker reported its quarterly results late today. and those results were two cents better than estimates. net sales were up from last year, too, and higher than expected. c-s-c-o has been undergoing a restructuring for the past year, managing uncertain demand for its telecommunications equipment's pinched profit margins. the stock was flat before tonight's earnings report. shares were up about 4% in extended hours trading. now, as erika reported earlier, home depot's strong third quarter earnings and optimistic tlookeallhelped drive buying interes today's 3.6% rally came on more than double its usual volume, and takes the stock to its highest price since 1999. but the buying interest did not extend to home depot's main rival, lowe's. lowe's shares were essentially unchanged even though volume was slightly heavier than average. home depot wasn't alone in reporting strong earnings. dick's sporting goods boosted fu
in the republican side is if you buy into green energy or if you play footsie on this issue, you do so at your political peril. >> you do, absolutely. and that's a big change, and it is important. again, i remember four, five or even three years ago, john, a lot of republicans, they would play games with this. they'd say, "okay, oh gosh, i think i need a green energy agenda. but i won't go all the way and support cap-and-trade." they did. they tried to walk down the middle and that's wrong. i think it's philosophically inconsistent, but it's also politically disadvantageous. and we've worked hard to make that so, by the way. the left has had the edge as long as i can remember. they march out to the towns, do whatever they are told to do... one thing we've changed with afp, is we now have an army too. and we can do calls and e-mails and letters and rallies, events, and pressure. and i think that's made a big difference. our side didn't have that five or six years ago on this iue. we do now. i do think it's a new day for that reason. (applause) >> hockenberry: this new day has dramatically trans
in exports to the eu and china and higher energy exports dragged down the trade balance. the deficit came to about $6 billion. exports amounted to about $64 billion. that's down 10.5%. imports were up 4.5% to $70 billion. manufacturing activity in japan declined in september. orders for machinery fell for the second straight month. cabinet office officials say the value of september orders received by major machinery makerers was $8.6 billion, down 4.3% in yen terms from the previous month. these nbers exclude volatile orders for ships and electric utilities. that's all for business news for this hour. i will leave you with a recap of the region's markets. >>> we're going back to china now. members of the country's ruling communist party have opened their congress. they're starting a process that will involve plenty of discussion and deal-making resulting in a major leadership transition. this is a live look inside the great hall of the people in beijing. more than 2,000 representatives have gathered from acros the country. members convene every five years to decide on key policies. presi
.s. will be nearly self-sufficient in energy by 2035. that's due to an expected surge in production of shale gas. a type of natural gas trapped in under ground rock. america relies on it for 20% of import needs. now let's get a check on the markets. the yen is losing ground slightly against the dollar and the euro. dollar/yen is changing hands at 79.57 and the euro/yen is quoted at 100.99 to 104. debt stricken greece could get bail out funds. share prices are rising slightly in tokyo. this morning the index stands at 8,695. that's up about two-tenths of a percent. the index fell six days in a row. investors are now buying back mainly export related issues. >>> other markets in special regions. the kospi is down about.14%. the people who will made japanese money, the operators of the national mint are pitching their services to overseas government. the first customer looks like being bangladesh. officials are expecting to receive the order soon for 500 million bangladesh's coins. they are made of stainless steel and worth about three cents. other bidders included britain and germany. japan's mint
to help. >> to be warm, to be sustained, to have the energy to continue. people are working in the cold. when you walk up to a person with a smile, a hot soup, a fresh pie of pizza, something to drink, just to tell them chabad is here for you, whatever it takes. >> given the severity of the situation, they may have to keep doing that for a long time to come. i'm kim lawton reporting. >>> in other news, british officials have announced the selection of the next archbishop of canterbury, spiritual head of the worldwide anglican communion. he is justin welby, the bishop of durham, in england. welby is 56 and a former oil executive who has been a bishop for only one year. he succeeds rowan williams, who is stepping down next month. he takes over an international body of churches deeply divided over several issues including homosexual. george carey, who was archbishop of canterbury from 1991 through 2002, was in washington this week to receive an award for his interfaith work. he told us welby is a good choice. >> just comes with very good credentials. i mean, he's a wise man. he's young eno
it. but there are a lot of unknowns. when you do theatre. and the energy of what it is you are in, you don't know where it can go. if someone can yell sothin out you know. i remember one time we were doing something and would you notice someone in the front row. like there was a whole story. you were probably brought here by a secretary. >> rose: some lady in the front row just wept oh, gosh. >> what did she say. >> which moment was t i can't remember but i said something and she was like oh god, you could see where this is going and was like oh god. >> or sometimes the father gets a his like if he says something to me. >> rose: does it bother you at all? >> it's sort of an indicati of where they're at, you know, that flock of birds out there. >> yeah. >> somehow becomes of one mind, you know. >> the mob mentallity. >> rose: in the world that we live in now, there's all kinds of blogs and if you do what i do and are you on conversation every-- television ef row day, morning, noon and night, you get a lot of people. and someone said to me so wisely once they said not about me, i w
on i can concentrate on my own -- people were giving him energy. now the players go hang on a minute. he's got enough to deal with. i know his swing is this and that and he can't play like he used to. i'll use that 10% of energy i was worrying about him where he was in the lead. i worry about myself now. and these youngsters have, like -- have got the freedom too go and play and they've had e oppounitto bt tiger and they more than likely will keep it. >> rose: if you were 21 today and in good as health as you've ever been, whose swing would you like to have? >> well, the best -- i mean, adams god. >> rose: what makes adam scott -- >> well, again, back to fundamentals. great grip, great posture, great takeaway, great body movement. the kids now have this wonderful -- we u track man. >> rose: kids like people like adam scott, rory mcelroy. >> well, i'd go to 15. these kids now have the knowledge where we did -- we were the pioneers of this knowledge. we didn't know how hard to train could you lift weights to train, what could we eat on the golf course? the first people to go and eat a
; just under 1.9 billion on the nasdaq. the energy sector led the sell- off, down 1.7%. consumer stocks were weak, falling 1.6%. and the tech sector was down another 1.4%. technology has been particular weak in this recent market sell- off. new product launches from apple and microsoft have not been enough to erase worries about consumer and company spending on technology. the sector exchange traded tells the story-- it fell 1.4% today at a three and a half month low. internet networking gear maker cisco systems was among those leading the way lower. it fell 2.2%. cisco is due to report earnings next week, giving investors a peak into its turnaround effort and corporate tech spending. the holiday sales may be starting earlier than ever this year, but some retailers, they've seen investor sales hit their stock prices. kohl's and coach target different types of shoppers, but both suffered stock drops. coach fell 5.3%. coach's business has been helped by its stores in china. a new set of communist leaders are expected to be announced in china in the coming days. meantime, kohl's fell 5.1%,
.e.o. of utility, next era energy on the dividend cliff and how tax hikes on dividends could impact his shareholders. >> tom: finally tonight, after all the billions of dollars spent on the election, those in office now have to work together to solve problems. and that's exactly what lou's been thinking this week. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> i used to tell people that when i ruled the world, everyone would have the same title on their business card: problem solver. isn't that why most of us get paid? a friend of mine asked recently, why is it that so many people just seems to want to argue rather than find an actual solution? good question! i think there might be at least three reasons. inertia: awful lot of people, even though they may argue this, like things just the way they are, even if things are broken. uncertainty: maybe they've been burned a few times or maybe they just hate not knowing the absolute right answer. maybe they have had bosses in the past who have not been very forgiving when mistakes were made. laziness: i feel bad even including this one, but i am
, frankly, the time and energy to devote to trying to catch up. they thought they could lock down this primary nomination by the end of january or early february and what end up happening is they played the sort of extended game of whack-a-mole where a different candidate came up every month and it wasn't until the end of april that they secured the nomination and at that point the romney campaign was pretty much broke. his image was battered by the nominating battle where he lurched to the right on a number of issues and he was in a bad position to take on the obama machine. they began to try to assemble a ground game and started raising money but even up until the end of the election this month, they didn't catch up displood in just a ver little timee have left, carol leigh what, would you say the obama folks said made the difference? the front-end spending that allowed them to soften romney up ahead of going into the republican convention, and they caught some breaks, too. if you remember, romney's 47% tape came right after the moment and underscored-- the argument they were ma
the business community. i know there's a lot of energy over the last couple of years and anger about the president, his plans and all that. now is the time for them to say, okay, he is our president. >> rose: right. >> there is no question on his validity. there's no question about -- and he wants to work with people. that is his nature. it truly is in spite of what may be said in the campaign. the business community has to come together and say okay, we may disagree but there are a whole host of things. like immigration. i know the business community, chamber of commerce, whole bunch of others who are historically republican are very much desirous to help the economy but getting real immigration reform. let's push it, work with the president, come into the president, come into the administration and say look, okay, you won. we didn't like it, we don't like it but let's work together. i think the business community has got to have that attitude and not just hope and pray as they did the last year and a half, many of them, that he wouldn't get reelected. well, that didn't work so well
, members of the house energy and commerce committee had their first chance to question the f.d.a. lawmakers wanted to know how the f.d.a. knew of problems at the pharmacy as early as 2002 but took no action. the agency later issued a warning letter in 2006 but again no tougher action was taken, either. >> after a tragedy like this, the first question we all ask is: could this have been prevented? after an examination of the documents produced by the massachusetts board of pharmacy and the f.d.a., the answer here appears to be yes. >> repoer: some eerts contend the f.d.a. already has the authority to regulate large compounding pharmacies. but in her first public remarks today, f.d.a. commissioner dr. peggy hamburg said her agency needs more power. dr. hamburg proposed a two-tier system where smaller, more traditional pharmacies are regulated by the state. larger pharmacies of all kinds would be overseen by the f.d.a. >> the fact that we have unclear, miteand contested authorities and ambiguities in the law, and a crazy quilt of legal authority has required us to be very reactive, responding
's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new york stock exchange is a good barometer for the worrywarts out there. wall street veteran teddy weissberg says many investors are just plain upset. there was an expectation that we would have some change and a change in the policies. and, i think with obama getting re-elected there are a lot of folks that are not happy, and we're kind of seeing that in the stock market. >> reporter: but, others say it's not just the disappointment of romney's loss, it's that the fiscal cliff now looms large on wall street. >> i think the big issue right now is the fiscal cliff, now that the election is behind us everyone is really focusing on what's going to happen at the endf this year, and of course if nothing's done by the end of the year that may very well mean a recession as early as next year. >> reporter: still, the best news for equity investors is that the election was decisive. the next few days or weeks will not be dominated by challenges or hangi
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)